PHYSICS WITH RELIGION

Physics :

What is an atom and what are atoms made of ?

Atom

Atoms are the basic building blocks of ordinary matter. Atoms can join together to form molecules, which in turn form most of the objects around you.

Atoms are composed of particles called protons, electrons and neutrons.

Protons :



Protons carry a positive electrical charge.

Electrons :

Electrons carry a negative electrical charge.

Neutrons :

Neutrons carry no electrical charge at all.

The protons and neutrons cluster together in the central part of the atom, called the nucleus, and the electrons 'orbit' the nucleus.

Atom

A particular atom will have the same number of protons and electrons and most atoms have at least as many neutrons as protons.

Protons and neutrons are both composed of other particles called quarks and gluons. Protons contain two 'up' (+) quarks and one 'down' (-) quark while neutrons contain one 'up' (+) quark and two 'down' (-) quarks.

The gluons are responsible for binding the quarks to one another.

Atom

Each family contains two quarks. The first family consists of Up and Down quarks, the quarks that join together to form protons and neutrons. The second family consists of Strange and Charm quarks and only exist at high energies. The third family consists of Top and Bottom quarks and only exist at very high energies.

Physics with Religion :

Nucleus (vishnu / preserver) :

The nucleus is composed of positively charged protons and neutrally charged neutrons.

Proton (shiv / destroyer) :

Protons also play a significant role because the tendency for an atom to either lose, gain or share electrons is dependent upon the charge of the nucleus.

Neutrons (brahma / balance) :

Since protons are positively charged, there is an incredibly strong repulsive force between all the protons in a nucleus. To counteract this strong repulsive force, neutrons apply an even stronger force on the protons in a nucleus (balance).

Electron (shakti / mother nature) :

Electron is the only fundamental particle that takes active part in any chemical reaction and so, results in the molecule or a compound formation.

This is the electron that is responsible for chemical reactions and so gives birth to three different states of matter viz. Solid, Liquid and Gases.

Number of Electrons and their configuration (Commonly known as Electronic Configuration) differs in various atoms and gives birth to so called "Elements" (life).

Nucleus (vishnu), Proton (shiv), Neutrons (brahma)
and Electron (shakti) :

The chemical reactivity of an atom is dependent upon the number of electrons and protons, and independent of the number of neutrons.

Yantra with Physics :

I am trying my best to make this as simple as possible so that everyone can understand.

A God and Goddess is represented by a Mantra and a mantra is represented by a Yantra. In order to understand the Yantra first we have to understand the atom which involves Chemistry and Physics.

Atom :

Atom

Atoms are the basic building blocks of ordinary matter. Atoms can join together to form molecules, which in turn form most of the objects around you.

Atoms are composed of particles called protons, electrons and neutrons. Protons carry a positive electrical charge, electrons carry a negative electrical charge and neutrons carry no electrical charge at all. The protons and neutrons cluster together in the central part of the atom, called the nucleus, and the electrons 'orbit' the nucleus. A particular atom will have the same number of protons and electrons and most atoms have at least as many neutrons as protons.

Atomic Number :

The atomic number uniquely identifies a chemical element. In an atom of neutral charge, the atomic number is also equal to the number of electrons.

Elements :

Elements consist of only one kind of atom and cannot be decomposed into simpler substances.

All versions of the periodic table include only chemical elements, not mixtures, compounds, or subatomic particles. Each chemical element has a unique atomic number representing the number of protons in its nucleus. Most elements have differing numbers of neutrons among different atoms, with these variants being referred to as isotopes. For example, carbon has three naturally occurring isotopes: all of its atoms have six protons and most have six neutrons as well, but about one per cent have seven neutrons, and a very small fraction have eight neutrons. Isotopes are never separated in the periodic table; they are always grouped together under a single element. Elements with no stable isotopes (Isotopes - One of two or more atoms having the same atomic number but different mass numbers) have the atomic masses of their most stable isotopes, where such masses are shown, listed in parentheses.

In the standard periodic table, the elements are listed in order of increasing atomic number (the number of protons in the nucleus of an atom). A new row (period) is started when a new electron shell has its first electron. Columns (groups) are determined by the electron configuration of the atom; elements with the same number of electrons in a particular subshell fall into the same columns (e.g. oxygen and selenium are in the same column because they both have four electrons in the outermost p-subshell). Elements with similar chemical properties generally fall into the same group in the periodic table, although in the f-block, and to some respect in the d-block, the elements in the same period tend to have similar properties, as well. Thus, it is relatively easy to predict the chemical properties of an element if one knows the properties of the elements around it.

As of 2013, the periodic table has 114 confirmed elements, comprising elements 1 (hydrogen) to 112 (copernicium), 114 (flerovium) and 116 (livermorium). Elements 113, 115, 117 and 118 have reportedly been synthesised in laboratories however none of these claims have been officially confirmed by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). As such these elements are currently known only by their systematic element names, based on their atomic numbers.

A total of 98 elements occur naturally; the remaining 16 elements, from einsteinium to copernicium, and flerovium and livermorium, occur only when synthesised in laboratories. Of the 98 elements that occur naturally, 84 are primordial. The other 14 elements occur only in decay chains of primordial elements.No element heavier than einsteinium (element 99) has ever been observed in macroscopic quantities in its pure form.

Periodic Table (click on the image to enlarge)

Decoding the triangles in Yantra :

There are total 43 Triangles in a Shri Yantra. In periodic table Element 43 is technetium

Technetium :

Technetium is the chemical element with atomic number 43 and the symbol Tc. It is the lowest atomic number element without any stable isotopes; every form of it is radioactive (Material that emits radiation energy in the form of alpha, beta, or gamma particles or rays). Nearly all technetium is produced synthetically, and only minute amounts are found in nature. Naturally occurring technetium occurs as a spontaneous fission product in uranium ore or by neutron capture in molybdenum ores. The chemical properties of this silvery gray, crystalline transition metal are intermediate between rhenium and manganese.

     
Shri Yantra
Technetium

The Image of Shri Yantra and of Technetium is similar.

By this we can come to a conclusion that Yantra is a symbol representing a specific chemical element of Atom.

The petals around the triangles is explained as below :-

Bounce Motion :

Some particles do move along the field lines of the Earth. The crowded magnetic field lines near the poles cause particles to "reflect" and move back from the same direction from which they came. They bounce back and forth from one pole of the Earth to the other.

Particle bouncing back and forth from one pole of the Earth to the other